snowy tent

Another challenge is the wetness from the melted snow, which dampens belongings and clothing.

MILFORD, Del. - As steady snowfall blankets the state, the harsh realities of homelessness become prevalent.

Destiny Hensley calls a tent in Milford home.

The snow fall and low temperatures poses a threat to her living outdoors.

"It has been terrible. The other night, especially with it like 15 degrees. I use hand warmers and unfortunately I don't use them in my gloves because I have to use them for heat, about like ten of them. And I put them underneath my blanket." said Hensley.

Martha Gery from Milford Advocacy for the Homeless, tearfully shared that these conditions have already had tragic consequences for some displaced individuals.

"We had somebody who perished in their car. And so that that was very disturbing. And he, you know, to be in your car and have to stay there for hours and hours." said Gery. "We have another young lady who's in the hospital right now. She's about to lose some of her toes."

Another challenge is the wetness from the melted snow, which dampens belongings and clothing. Despite these hardships, Hensley remains optimistic,

"There's a lot of struggles and, you know, heartache and trials that come with it. But I try to keep myself safe and warm. Most definitely."

As Hensley works to find a permanent property to stay on, she has set up a go-fund-me to get a more weather resilient home.

Milford Advocacy for the Homeless is working to set up warming shelters for Jan. 20 and 22, but will need volunteers in two hour increments to help oversee each site. The nonprofit also encourages people to go to the City of Milford's public hearing on Monday, Jan. 22 in support of the Spring Board Collaborative's initiative to bring a pallet village to Milford to house homeless.